About

Born in Buenos Aires and based in New York, German Palacio is an electronic musician, video and multimedia artist with a free spirit and plenty of projects. One of these is the--mostly solo--venture called Ulisespal, and its sound is warm and texture.
This Blog is an international research laboratory where current trends and insights into the future of fashion, design and lifestyle are there to be discovered. Its key aim is to give visibility and a platform for a new generation of creators to anticipate new trends.

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Handcrafted garments, avant-garde treatment of textiles, experimentation in the use of colors. These are the ingredients of Diletta Forgnone Gianeri’s A/W 2012-13 collection, which strikes a balance between timeless elegance and urban taste. The lines of her pieces are essential and geometric, with unexpected outlines. Oblique cuts or curves give her colors rhythm, interior movement to the silhouettes and daring ideas for the seaming. There’s much which is autobiographical in Diletta’s language. From her great-grandfather who was a set designer, she inherited her poetic and creative vein. Her maternal grandfather Danilo Magnoni, owner of the homonymous textile company, is responsible for her interest in fabrics. Her aesthetic evokes the past and a timeless elegance, but also the female figures of her family, like her grandmother, who embodied simplicity and subtle elegance. After graduating at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, Diletta worked for Tommy Hilfiger and Custo Barcelona, with stylists Sabina Schreder, Tosho Takeda and Mark Vassallo, and with Vincent Skeltis, right-hand man of photographer David La Chapelle. Her first fashion line was made in Tel Aviv in 2000. In 2003, she founded her showroom in Turin. Casual simplicity and elegance are the thread that connect the pieces of her collection, an essential freedom that adapts to the hectic contemporary urban style. Photos via diletta.eu

Yingzhi Luo – Chi Chi’s graduate collection 2011 is a long trip through local artisanal traditions. From Tibetan tribes to Africa, passing through folklore and European witchcraft, he amalgamates each reference like different inks in the same glass. Part of the collection, for example, is inspired by the braids of Tibetan women. The handmade embroidery and macramé, often with beads at the end in reference to Buddhist prayer beads, particularly stand out. Chi Chi Luo used yards of chiffon, silk and cotton, in jersey or in fabric. A long manual labor through which she separated the elements, cut them into strips, folded them and then knotted them together by hand before immersing them in baths of color. The collection, shot by Sean Michael and illustrated by the Luo herself, tread the catwalk of London College of Fashion on June 7th 2011. It was nominated as Most Creative Student Collection at the WGSN Global Fashion Awards of 2011 and Chi Chi was selected as “Best fashion graduate student of 2011” by Vogue.com UK. Photos via chichiluo.com

"Dress as if your life depended on it, or don’t  bother". So says Leigh Bowery, the artist which inspired Yui Tai with her graduate project "Open-Minded", an aesthetic investigation of distorsions of the body applied to fashion, and presented at London College of Fashion.

When speaking of non-conformity and interactions between body and dress, you can’t disregard the figure of fashion designer, body-artist and Australian performer Leigh Bowery. With his unique and excessive style Bowery reformed the way of looking at the silhouette and conventional aesthetics.

His media of choice was his body, on which his overflowing imagination would build a style that was mostly a transgender spectacle of tailoring details and make-up. From this combination of surreal silhouettes, exaggerated volumes and unique proportions comes collection “Open-Minded” by Yui Tai, who plays with the shape of the human body by adding layers of cotton wool to the skin, until finding her own personal voice.

Photos via kayuitai.tumblr.com

Shiny edges and traces of imperceptible movements. Photographic series “Color of Beats” is the result of great teamwork. Its authors seem to be foretelling a future in which colors will have a musical rhythm. 

Or maybe they already have and we just haven’t found a way of formalizing the concept scientifically. In the meantime Yanzhou Bao’s poetic sensibility can satisfy us, with her portrayal of light movements, which usually are not captured by a photographer. 

Oscillations, vibrations, poses, light though powerful gestures. Yanzhou Bao creates electric and engaging atmospheres using long and multiple exposures and playing on contrasts and movement in the garments designed by Hailey Chan.

"Color of Beats" is a choreographic work that seems to be implying something. A sensation or an undefinable thought of its authors, a story made of subliminal frames driven by the rhythm of colors and projecting us forward.

Photos via behance.net

Cinema and contemporary literature are what inspired Marianna Barksdale’s F/W 2012 womenswear collection. Precisely the movie “13 Assassins” by Takashi Miike and Lisbeth Salander, the heroine of writer Stieg Larsson. 

What does a heroine wear? Marianna Barksdale takes a tailor’s prospective. Her handmade garments count on workmanship and detailed decoration in the fabrics, developing each collection like a story.

Deconstruction and sustainability are fundamental in the research and development of her line, that experiments new construction and patternmaking techniques based on traditional couture.

To protect, arm and intimidate. There are the concepts that orient her aesthetic. It’s no coincidence if the mood of her F/W 2012 collection “13 Assassins” reflects that of the homonymous movie by Japanese director Takashi Miike, set in the violent world of the samurai.

As it is no surprise that the muse of the New York fashion designer is the female protagonist of the “Millenium” trilogy by Steig Larsson, a dark and hard-boiled character, armed to the teeth, with an enormous dragon tattooed on her back, who nonetheless never loses her delicate feminine vulnerability.

http://www.barksdalestudio.com/#1

Vertical, aerial silhouettes caught in a dialectic between interior-exterior and full-empty. We leaf through the layers of Covherlab’s Fall 2012 collection “Twentythree”, full of references to Italian Rationalist architecture. 

Marco Grisolia, fashion designer at Covherlab, has a soft spot for 20th century Italian architecture, famous for its formal rigor and clean lines. 

If we try to interpret the name of the collection, “Twentythree”, we could read it as a reference to the year of publication of a fundamental book for Rationalist architecture, “Towards an Architecture" (Vers une architecture) by Le Corbusier.

But Grisolia’s outfits are not weighed down by an excessive adherence to that movement. The collection has its roots in highly tailored menswear, with vertical panels inserted in maxi button holes that soften the shapes and at the same time create sophisticated layers of slotted fabric.

The cut-out motif recurring in different elements of the pieces gives way to embossing, chromatic contrasts and an ethereal elegance obtained by the juxtaposition of different textures and textiles, worsted wool, tasseled cotton and Jaquard with a tartan print. 

Essential, neutral, ultra-light? Yes, but the impeccable construction of each piece is revealed in the details, which ramify and give rhythm to the volumes and shapes. 

http://covherlab.blogspot.it/

Here we go again with color blocking, the Spring/Summer 2011 trend that juxtaposes contrasting hues. But with her S/S 2013 graduate collection, fashion designer Emily Seul Ki Uhm adds some geometric and decorative variations to the theme.

The title of the collection is eloquent enough: “Visual Illusion Through Textile”. Classic shapes like long coats with a masculine cut become gowns thanks to small but intense structural manipulations of the textiles: fine cuffs, transparent veils and textures with an ironic touch. 

The collection is based on daring combinations of various bright tones and movement is given by stripes, polka dots and checkered patterns in relief that subdue the rigid geometries of the garments though still creating a minimalist look. 

Born and raised in Seoul, Emily Seul Ki Uhm recently completed her Master’s in Fashion Design & Technology at London College of Fashion, after having graduated from School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). 

This collection was presented at the runway show “Poemtry” on 2/2/2012 at Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where it was particularly lauded for the work on the fabrics, which give rhythm to the tactile perception of the surfaces and volumes.

http://showtime.arts.ac.uk/UHE10315213

A fashion collection isn’t made of clothes alone. Label NOMAN dissects the garment to express it through various disciplines. New line “Oman” will be displayed at the Istanbul Design biënnale.

NOMAN is a fashion collective founded by fashion designer Selina Parr and production designer Lara Tolman. The idea behind the project is quite original: to create an alternative world in which individual personalities and egos are subordinate to the collective. 

The collection isn’t meant to be worn and then end up in the back of the wardrobe at the end of the season. But rather to be a contemporary representation of different disciplines and entice the fashion palates that are well inclined towards experimental recipes.

"Oman" is the latest collection created by amalgamating pieces of textile in strictly pastel colors, each cut according to rounded profiles and avoiding traditional pattern-making techniques.

The result is more than a collection of garments, it’s the mood of a season, a colorful and bizarre installation. “Oman” is a runway of concepts exalted by a communication style that has nothing to envy the ironic choreographies of a Daft Punk music video directed by Michel Gondry. 

http://n-o-m-a-n.com/

Before leaving they put on their helmets, like any good space travelling model would. And the signs of the voyage are visible on the clothes. Anrealage’s F/W 2012 collection “Time” is a creative trip into the last 40 years of fashion.

From the 60s Mod look to the bright neons of the 80s, passing by psychedelia and all its undertones. At Tokyo Fashion Week 2012, Japanese fashion designer Kunihiko Morinaga presents herself with a collection inspired by the passage of time. 

But the tic-toc of fashion for Morinaga makes a liquid sound. Piece after piece, print after print, color after color, the passing of time leaves smears, like dabs of makeup between one garment and the next.

Two blurry photos blending into each other, a smudged photocopy. And distorted textures, stretched, like “accelerating motifs”. But the effect of this constantly evolving process is not only reflected in the prints.

It’s spelled “Anrealage” but it’s pronounced “A Real” or “Unreal” “Age”. And designer Morinaga proves that all you need is details, the passing of seconds, for example, to come up with a fashion idea. Risky. And luckily so, we might add.

http://anrealage.com/

Space, touch, emotion. In her first collection, fashion designer Vigin (Wan Ying) Lo from Hong Kong combines her research of traditional Korean languages with modern dance. 
Vigin Lo has a conceptual approach. What interests her is the two dimensional pattern cutting of garments and the exploration of their possible interactions with the body, to the point of making them become a second skin. 
The designs in the collection presented at London College of Fashion (for her MA in Fashion Design Technology) contain 6 basic geometric figures (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, trapezes and rhombuses), that the designer uses to obtain 15 different combinations. 
Each two dimensional model is developed to contour the body. Lines, surfaces and volumes interact with one another, creating different interstices between garment and skin. Thus the concept of space. 
The tactile concept on the other hand explores the various fabrics, combining them until obtaining a piece with a motley surface that changes to the touch. 
The concept of emotion is expressed through the chromatic palette of the collection, from black to beige and white. There you have the three elements, so intimately connected they become interdependent. 
http://www.viginlo.com/

Space, touch, emotion. In her first collection, fashion designer Vigin (Wan Ying) Lo from Hong Kong combines her research of traditional Korean languages with modern dance. 

Vigin Lo has a conceptual approach. What interests her is the two dimensional pattern cutting of garments and the exploration of their possible interactions with the body, to the point of making them become a second skin. 

The designs in the collection presented at London College of Fashion (for her MA in Fashion Design Technology) contain 6 basic geometric figures (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, trapezes and rhombuses), that the designer uses to obtain 15 different combinations. 

Each two dimensional model is developed to contour the body. Lines, surfaces and volumes interact with one another, creating different interstices between garment and skin. Thus the concept of space. 

The tactile concept on the other hand explores the various fabrics, combining them until obtaining a piece with a motley surface that changes to the touch. 

The concept of emotion is expressed through the chromatic palette of the collection, from black to beige and white. There you have the three elements, so intimately connected they become interdependent. 

http://www.viginlo.com/

Ulisespal _ Free Land

Who knows if Gabriel Garcia Marquez might have suspected it. “100 Years Of Solitude”, his literary masterpiece, has inspired a fashion collection. It’s called “Magical Realism”, and is by Tata Christiane.
Tata Christiane is a fashion and costume label founded by Julie Bourgeois and Hanrigabriel. It offers both one-off and serial pieces, as well as costumes for theatre, concerts, movies and artistic installations.
The disturbed soul is a thing of beauty for Tata Christane. Absurd, decadent, excessive and extravagant. Playing on that fine line that separates elegance and kitsch, digging up ancient memories sewn together into sublime pieces covered by a veil of irony.
"Magical Realism" navigates in an ocean of inspirations. Starting from the idea connected to its title, "magical realism", coined for the first time in 1925 by Franz Roh to define a particular literary genre in which the magical elements blend with the realistic ones, creating something entirely new.
The walls in which the objective world is enclosed, collapse. All that remains is a “city of mirrors”, as defined by Julie Bourgeois and visualized by Valquire Veljkovic in his own way, in the photo shoot. A mysterious labyrinth of subjectivity, with simulated emotions, a mix of motifs and textiles, feathers and frou-frou. In one expression, a fantastic “Magical Realism”
http://www.tatachristiane.com

Who knows if Gabriel Garcia Marquez might have suspected it. “100 Years Of Solitude”, his literary masterpiece, has inspired a fashion collection. It’s called “Magical Realism”, and is by Tata Christiane.

Tata Christiane is a fashion and costume label founded by Julie Bourgeois and Hanrigabriel. It offers both one-off and serial pieces, as well as costumes for theatre, concerts, movies and artistic installations.

The disturbed soul is a thing of beauty for Tata Christane. Absurd, decadent, excessive and extravagant. Playing on that fine line that separates elegance and kitsch, digging up ancient memories sewn together into sublime pieces covered by a veil of irony.

"Magical Realism" navigates in an ocean of inspirations. Starting from the idea connected to its title, "magical realism", coined for the first time in 1925 by Franz Roh to define a particular literary genre in which the magical elements blend with the realistic ones, creating something entirely new.

The walls in which the objective world is enclosed, collapse. All that remains is a “city of mirrors”, as defined by Julie Bourgeois and visualized by Valquire Veljkovic in his own way, in the photo shoot. A mysterious labyrinth of subjectivity, with simulated emotions, a mix of motifs and textiles, feathers and frou-frou. In one expression, a fantastic “Magical Realism”

http://www.tatachristiane.com

Statuesque Gothic cathedrals with high gable walls, soaring pinnacles and rearing arches. Peter Movrin opens their massive doors to the Orient and the world of Islam with his first collection, “FranzMadonna”.
Born in 1986, with a degree from the University of Ljubliana in 2011, Movrin moves in a fantastic world that is surrounded by a ghostly mist and populated by dark angels with maimed wings.
This is the imagery present in the graduate collection of this young Slovenian fashion designer, which won him the Mercator Prize.
His ambiguous model wears long laser-cut leather coats partnered with silk underskirts and embroidered headpieces that cover the face and resemble medieval battle helmets.
Like the somber recesses of a Gothic cathedral, Peter has engraved his powerful, detailed leather garments with elegant perforations through which timid rays of light can creep through.
A touch of romantic ruffles and lace decorating the heavy leather armors lightens the dark atmosphere of the collection… What lies beneath this suffering veneer.
http://www.notjustalabel.com/petermovrin

Statuesque Gothic cathedrals with high gable walls, soaring pinnacles and rearing arches. Peter Movrin opens their massive doors to the Orient and the world of Islam with his first collection, “FranzMadonna”.

Born in 1986, with a degree from the University of Ljubliana in 2011, Movrin moves in a fantastic world that is surrounded by a ghostly mist and populated by dark angels with maimed wings.

This is the imagery present in the graduate collection of this young Slovenian fashion designer, which won him the Mercator Prize.

His ambiguous model wears long laser-cut leather coats partnered with silk underskirts and embroidered headpieces that cover the face and resemble medieval battle helmets.

Like the somber recesses of a Gothic cathedral, Peter has engraved his powerful, detailed leather garments with elegant perforations through which timid rays of light can creep through.

A touch of romantic ruffles and lace decorating the heavy leather armors lightens the dark atmosphere of the collection… What lies beneath this suffering veneer.

http://www.notjustalabel.com/petermovrin

He’s been digging in search of his roots, researching socialism in former Yugoslavia, but found himself taking unexpected directions, between tribal mysticism, magic abstractions and science fiction. Here’s the new Sadak collection.
Behind label SADAK is Serbian indie fashion designer Sasa Kovacevic, whose S/S 2011 collection narrates of a micro-nation called “Ex-land”, an imaginary state where contrasting inspirations merge.
From the traditional costumes of rural Serbia, to the psychedelic posters of the “Western bloc” in the late 60s. But Sasa’s influences also include socialist symbolism and slogans used as propaganda after World War II.
Mixed together, these elements stratify into a continuous flow of metallic colors, transformable jackets and geometric shapes that give a nod to the future with a revisitation of Yugoslav clothes from the past.
German photographer Daniel Bolliger shoots and handles post-production, capturing this lively collection and its textural ambiguities, shapes and dynamic cultural references rooted in a precise historical time but reinterpreted to a present day “Ex-land”. 
Five models emerge from his sandy backdrops like holy Balkan saints from an ochre mist reminiscent of the gilding on Byzantine icons, but with a contemporary feel.
http://www.danielbolliger.com/

He’s been digging in search of his roots, researching socialism in former Yugoslavia, but found himself taking unexpected directions, between tribal mysticism, magic abstractions and science fiction. Here’s the new Sadak collection.

Behind label SADAK is Serbian indie fashion designer Sasa Kovacevic, whose S/S 2011 collection narrates of a micro-nation called “Ex-land”, an imaginary state where contrasting inspirations merge.

From the traditional costumes of rural Serbia, to the psychedelic posters of the “Western bloc” in the late 60s. But Sasa’s influences also include socialist symbolism and slogans used as propaganda after World War II.

Mixed together, these elements stratify into a continuous flow of metallic colors, transformable jackets and geometric shapes that give a nod to the future with a revisitation of Yugoslav clothes from the past.

German photographer Daniel Bolliger shoots and handles post-production, capturing this lively collection and its textural ambiguities, shapes and dynamic cultural references rooted in a precise historical time but reinterpreted to a present day “Ex-land”. 

Five models emerge from his sandy backdrops like holy Balkan saints from an ochre mist reminiscent of the gilding on Byzantine icons, but with a contemporary feel.

http://www.danielbolliger.com/


A trip into the surreal landscapes of artist H. R. Giger, creator of the monstrous Alien, whose nightmarish imagery and biomechanical creatures have managed to influence even the world of fashion. Thanks to designer Malgorzata Dudek.
H. R. Giger has illustrated and sculpted the deepest fears and feelings that reside in the contemporary human subconscious, projecting them into the future as if they were beings awaiting metamorphosis, incubating larvae in endless anthill-cities ready to take flight.
Now young Polish fashion designer Malgorzata Dudek tries to transfer the Swiss artist’s visions on fabric, in a tribute collection that has been reviewed and approved by Giger himself.
Architecture, music, cinema, tattoos and design. The infernal universe of Giger’s airbrush and sculptures has influenced numerous fields of figurative art.
In Malgorzata Dudek’s “Giger’s Goddess” collection we find various references to the works of the artist, such as “Li” and the neonatal heads of “Landscape XVIII”.
Apart from the garments themselves we also find accessories by designer Slav Nowosad, inspired by the iconic sculptures of Giger’s “Birth Machine”.
http://www.malgorzatadudek.com/

A trip into the surreal landscapes of artist H. R. Giger, creator of the monstrous Alien, whose nightmarish imagery and biomechanical creatures have managed to influence even the world of fashion. Thanks to designer Malgorzata Dudek.

H. R. Giger has illustrated and sculpted the deepest fears and feelings that reside in the contemporary human subconscious, projecting them into the future as if they were beings awaiting metamorphosis, incubating larvae in endless anthill-cities ready to take flight.

Now young Polish fashion designer Malgorzata Dudek tries to transfer the Swiss artist’s visions on fabric, in a tribute collection that has been reviewed and approved by Giger himself.

Architecture, music, cinema, tattoos and design. The infernal universe of Giger’s airbrush and sculptures has influenced numerous fields of figurative art.

In Malgorzata Dudek’s “Giger’s Goddess” collection we find various references to the works of the artist, such as “Li” and the neonatal heads of “Landscape XVIII”.

Apart from the garments themselves we also find accessories by designer Slav Nowosad, inspired by the iconic sculptures of Giger’s “Birth Machine”.

http://www.malgorzatadudek.com/